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28 January 2013

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Edward Harkins

Isn't this just a little bit of taking a static snapshot based on what has happened, and then assuming that that will be the continued pattern in what might be an epoch-changing period? Might not there be wholly new and powerful economic and trading dynamics arising out of a dismembered UK staying in the EU whilst an independent Scotland retained/renewed EU membership?

There seems, moreover, to be some growing scope for assuming that from here on in, the EU will gradually pull out of the current morass and then recover and grow at a a stronger and more sustainable rate than the UK. In that scenario, pro-independence parties could convincingly argue that 'better an independent Scotland within the renewing EU, than in a UK economy suffering long-term debility consequent upon the legacy of irresponsible Brownite economics and then Osborne's utter ineptness and devastating Plan A and Austerity'?

Bruce Alexander

This assumes that the rUK leaving the EU will have no effect on either's dealings with Scotland. Given the choice between a market of 400 million and one of 60 million I know which one I'd go for if it was a straight choice.

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